Tag Archives: Eddie Marshall

Discussions with Hitler about Digital Photography

Jack Corbett and Adara Michaels
Hitler told me the night of 9/11/2001 my digital camera was a toy, and although Hitler was right about a lot of things, he was dead wrong about the future of digital photography. That was the evening after the World Trade Center had gone down. I was on assignment for Xtreme Magazine. My mission was to cover Adara Michaels and Scandalous. Besides the interview of Adara I was to get pictures of her with the other half of the blonde duo that called itself Scandalous. But Hitler would have none of it. The only pictures that would ever be taken of Adara had to be taken by him, and as Adara told me during the interview, Hitler had to be obeyed.

What really made Scandalous the most riveting feature act of its day, was Eddie Marshall’s expertise with lighting and special affects every bit as much as Adara’s superlative dancing skills. But with Eddie, it all had to be his way or the highway. It had been his idea to have the blonde twin sister act in the first place, and now that I think back twelve years after that interview I realize that Hitler was right about most things. For one thing I have learned that most women are absolutely unable to differentiate their best pictures from their worse. So Eddie’s insistence of having complete control over the picture taking process was right on target. I’m sure that Eddie also insisted that the two blondes comprising the Scandalous duo should totally respect his way of doing things. There could be no room for that petty jealousy that often arises between two entertainers. But from what I could glean from Adara while interviewing her, she could respect that. So when I asked her what the key to her success was, she just laughed and said, “Hitler.”

Back in September of 2001, I was using a Kodak DC-3 digital camera, which was a big step up from the Kodak DC-40 I had started off with in January of 1997, but it was still not up to the best Nikon film cameras most of the adult professional photographers were using. Less than a year later I spent the big bucks for the Nikon D-1 X. The following year I once again ran into Hitler– this time at Nudes-A-Poppin. When I saw him carrying a Nikon D-1 X just like mine I couldn’t help myself. I even addressed him as Hitler, with no malice intended, “Hitler, I thought you said that digital cameras weren’t any good?”

“Times have changed,” Hitler smiled back at me and replied.